The Quezon Memorial Shrine is dedicated to the unrivalled legacy of the first president of the Commonwealth of the Philippines, Manuel L. Quezon.

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Introduction

The Quezon Memorial Shrine is dedicated to the unrivalled legacy of the first president of the Commonwealth of the Philippines, Manuel L. Quezon. It is a national shrine highlighted by a 66-meter trylon monument at the heart of Quezon City’s most important park. The monument’s three columns and angels bowed in grief, holding sampaguita wreaths, represent Luzon, Visayas, and Mindanao. It has a museum that features Quezoniana relics and memorabilia, and a mausoleum where the remains of Quezon and his wife, Aurora Aragon Quezon, were interred.

Prior to becoming president, Quezon pioneered the peaceful campaign for Philippine independence as Resident Commissioner in the U.S. House of Representatives (1909-1916) and later on Senate President of the Philippine Legislature (1916-1935). One of his greatest achievements was the ratification of the Tydings-McDuffie Act, which paved the way to a 10-year transitional government called the Commonwealth.

His presidency was considered the most successful in the history of the Philippines. He pioneered economic programs, policies, and public improvements. He championed social justice including women’s suffrage, and institutionalized Filipino as the national language. During World War II, Quezon became a symbol of hope for the Filipino people as he tirelessly campaigned to hasten the rescue of the Philippines. These campaigns were fulfilled with the surrender of the Imperial Japanese forces on September 2, 1945. This liberation is attributed to President Quezon’s lifelong work which culminated in the inauguration of the independent Republic of the Philippines.